Testing

This blog is all about female reproductive stuff and pregnancy. If you are squimish and grossed out by girly things, you should probably move on to a different post…

 

I don’t have a fitting photo for this, so you guys get the glory that is my bad drawing.

Three weeks ago, I met with the first OB to actually try to figure things out. After 10 years of catching shit, being told that I am exaggerating, that this isn’t possible, and that there is nothing they can do to help, I finally got the opportunity to sit down with someone who gave a damn and wanted to find an answer and a solution.

So, he put in for 14 different labs to be run as well as 2 types of ultrasounds. The labs were all crazy, crazy things…include what was essentially a chromosome mapping. They were checking to make sure the “arms” of my chromosomes weren’t touching…something similar to what I drew below. (And hey, don’t judge me, I am just trying to reproduce the Doc’s drawings…) This would actually make it impossible for me to carry to term, as I could not pass on the correct amount of chromosomes for a child to actually form. He explained that further, but yea…I don’t remember a whole lot from biology class as I skipped school A LOT freshman year.

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The two types of ultrasounds were the more interesting part of this experience. I have had both transabdominal and transvaginal ultrasounds before, but I never really understood the difference in the imaging. So, they both suck, but in very different ways. For the transabdominal ultrasound, you need to totally fill your bladder…and wait…and wait…and then let someone jab you in the guy with the ultrasound wand. All of this without peeing yourself. It is glorious. 😦

So, the transabdominal ultrasound was to look at the general shape of the uterus and ovaries. In particular, Doc was looking to make sure the top of my uterus curved upwards instead of inwards or being flat. He was also looking for sizing and placement of ovaries (I know, my left ovary is facing a funny way in my drawing, I said I was bad at this…) and fallopian tubes. Plus, was looking for any sort of cysts in my ovaries, though nothing from my history suggested PCOS.

The transvaginal ultrasound is the exact opposite…you need a totally empty bladder. So, it is the mad dash to the bathroom and making sure you pee twice. Oh, and I got SUPER lucky because the fire alarm went off in between the two, so I had 20 minutes to make sure I really had to pee that second time. (How do I do an eye roll emoji in wordpress?!) This ultrasound is super uncomfortable, as you have to insert the “slim” (totally their words, not mine) wand inside your vagina and then they move it in all sorts of painful and awkward directions and press it into every organ it can possibly reach. So, if you are already there for pain, especially oh say, pain during or after sex, it is pretty much excruciating.
The two things Doc was looking for with this second ultrasound were focused on the lining of my uterus. We already knew my cervix was beat to hell and scarred up…but there is no reason for my uterus to be. He was looking to see if tissue had formed down the center of my uterus, essentially splitting it into two. He was also looking at the general lining, to see if it was torn or building up in places, suggesting possible endometriosis. I had an old endometriosis diagnosis from 2006, but he didn’t think that was actually accurate or likely given the general symptom of easily becoming pregnant. Another thing that he was looking for was the formation of polyps or cysts within my uterus. This was very unlikely, as polyps normally form in women immediately prior, during, or immediately after menopause, and I am not exactly close to that age.

 

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So, after an annoyingly long day at the hospital, I managed to have a consultation, 17 vials of blood drawn, an ultrasound, a fire alarm, and another ultrasound…then I got to go to work. I was a little cranky by the end of it all.

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